LIEB BLOG

How current events impact business & real estate

Showing posts with label lender. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lender. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Foreclosure Alert - Lenders Required to Provide Single Point of Contact to Borrowers

Starting January 2, 2022, borrowers negotiating a loan modification have a right to a single point of contact at their lender.


On November 3, 2021, Governor Hochul signed BillS671 into law, which amends Section 6-o to the banking law, and starting on January 3, 2022, upon written request by the borrower, lenders will be required to provide borrowers with a single point of contact who must provide accurate account and other information related to the foreclosure process and loss mitigation efforts.


This is huge because many mortgage modifications are functionally blocked by a lack of access to lenders rather than based upon qualification criteria. As the foreclosure moratorium is coming to an end on January 15, 2022 and a wave of foreclosures are about to hit New York State, this is a needed law for borrowers, and their attorneys, to settle cases.




Thursday, August 06, 2020

Mortgage Lender Warning - No Consideration Deed

The Appellate Division recently reminded us of the importance of investigating a no consideration deed prior to issuing a mortgage to the titleholder. 

In 2386 Hempstead, Inc. v. 182 St., Inc., the Appellate Division held that the no consideration deed constituted notice of a potential previous fraud in the title spurring a duty to make inquiry concerning the circumstances of the transaction at issue. 

By failing to make such inquiry, the lender lost its status as a bona fide encumbrancer for value and therefore, jeopardized its status as a prior lienholder, who gets paid first in a foreclosure action. 


Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Foreclosure Tsunami Coming - Litigation Checklist

The moratorium on foreclosures expires on August 20th (EO 202.28) and a foreclosure tsunami is coming.

According to CNBC, "32% of U.S. households missed their July housing payments" based on a survey by Apartment List, which also advises that 17% of "homeowners [are] concerned about foreclosure."

To prepare for the tsunami, we are giving you our 10-Point Inspection Checklist to evaluate a foreclosure case. Whether we are representing the lender or the borrower, we utilize this list to evaluate the strength of the case, which, when coupled with an evaluation of the borrower's current mortgage terms (i.e., L/V ratio front end/back end, interest rate, principal, interest to date, penalties, attorneys' fees, months of missed payments, prior modifications/forbearances, etc.) is how we assess whether a modification, or other workout, should be considered.

10 Point Inspection Checklist:

  1. Standing of plaintiff (owner / holder of note on date of commencement or authorized agent of such owner / holder pursuant to Pooling and Servicing Agreement or other agreement)
  2. Record admissibility (swearing to business records of another entity; failure to attach business records to affidavits)
  3. RPAPL 1303 / 1304 / 1305 / 1306 compliance
  4. Acceleration / Deacceleration (statute of limitations) 
  5. Notices tendered in satisfaction of note terms
  6. Lis Pendens filing
  7. Payment history for default calculations / date (requisite missed months for default requirement in note / aligned with notices / statute of limitations)
  8. Default on Answer with time since settlement conference for late answer availability
  9. Service / personal jurisdiction issues
  10. Pleadings requirements (Certificate of Merit - CPLR 3012-B, RPAPL 1302)

In our upcoming Real Estate Investing shows, WRCN / FM 103.9 / Sundays at Noon, we will be breaking down this list into plain English and showing you how to litigate foreclosure cases whether you are the lender or the borrower.

Saturday, December 07, 2019

New Law: Reverse Mortgages Regulated

On December 6, 2019, A5626 was signed into law to regulate reverse mortgages. The new law takes effect on March 5, 2020. 

A reverse mortgage means "[a] loan which is secured by a first mortgage on real property improved by a one- to four-family residence or condominium that is the residence of the mortgagor(s) the proceeds of which are advanced to the mortgagor(s) during the term of the loan in equal installments, in advances through a line of credit or otherwise, in lump sums, or through a combination thereof."

The new law has the following features at new Real Property Law section 280-b:

  1. Marketing & offering of reverse mortgage loans are regulated to avoid unfair or deceptive practices;
  2. Consumer protection materials are required to be included in marketing such loans & the Superintendent is authorized to promulgate rules & regulations to protect consumers;
  3. Loans that pay taxes, mortgage insurance, homeowners insurance, or other property obligations must provide the borrower with periodic account statements & a required warning notice;
  4. When the escrowed money for payments of obligations are depleted to 10% or less, the borrower will get a telephone & mailed notice about the borrowers obligations; 
  5. Restricts lenders from paying borrowers obligations on the property (taxes, mortgage insurance, homeowners insurance, etc.) as advance payments & only permits lenders to pay when there are arrears;
  6. Restricts foreclosures based on primary residence restrictions; 
  7. Requires both the lender & the borrower to be represented by an attorney at the closing of the loan; 
  8. Borrowers who are injured from a violation by a lender have a private right of action for treble damages & reasonable attorneys' fees; & 
  9. Violating this statute by a lender works a complete defense for a borrower in a foreclosure action.