LIEB BLOG

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Showing posts with label Foreclosure Defense. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Foreclosure Defense. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Consent to Foreclosure or Deed in Lieu as Mortgage Workout Options: Which is Better?

With roughly 10% of Long Island homeowners behind on their mortgage, it's time to start thinking about foreclosure settlement options. Andrew Lieb breaks down the difference between a deed-in-lieu and a consent to foreclosure in this helpful article for lenders and borrowers alike.




Monday, October 05, 2020

Federal Eviction and Foreclosure Moratoriums Invite Litigation

Andrew Lieb published the article in The Suffolk Lawyer, Federal Eviction and Foreclosure Moratoriums Invite Litigation. This article discusses issues that will be litigated if an eviction moratorium is raised as a defense to an eviction proceeding.

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Foreclosure Tsunami Coming - Litigation Checklist

The moratorium on foreclosures expires on August 20th (EO 202.28) and a foreclosure tsunami is coming.

According to CNBC, "32% of U.S. households missed their July housing payments" based on a survey by Apartment List, which also advises that 17% of "homeowners [are] concerned about foreclosure."

To prepare for the tsunami, we are giving you our 10-Point Inspection Checklist to evaluate a foreclosure case. Whether we are representing the lender or the borrower, we utilize this list to evaluate the strength of the case, which, when coupled with an evaluation of the borrower's current mortgage terms (i.e., L/V ratio front end/back end, interest rate, principal, interest to date, penalties, attorneys' fees, months of missed payments, prior modifications/forbearances, etc.) is how we assess whether a modification, or other workout, should be considered.

10 Point Inspection Checklist:

  1. Standing of plaintiff (owner / holder of note on date of commencement or authorized agent of such owner / holder pursuant to Pooling and Servicing Agreement or other agreement)
  2. Record admissibility (swearing to business records of another entity; failure to attach business records to affidavits)
  3. RPAPL 1303 / 1304 / 1305 / 1306 compliance
  4. Acceleration / Deacceleration (statute of limitations) 
  5. Notices tendered in satisfaction of note terms
  6. Lis Pendens filing
  7. Payment history for default calculations / date (requisite missed months for default requirement in note / aligned with notices / statute of limitations)
  8. Default on Answer with time since settlement conference for late answer availability
  9. Service / personal jurisdiction issues
  10. Pleadings requirements (Certificate of Merit - CPLR 3012-B, RPAPL 1302)

In our upcoming Real Estate Investing shows, WRCN / FM 103.9 / Sundays at Noon, we will be breaking down this list into plain English and showing you how to litigate foreclosure cases whether you are the lender or the borrower.

Friday, January 10, 2020

New Law: Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act Extended to 1/1/2021

On December 20, 2019, Public Law No: 116-94 extended 26 USC 108(a)(1)(E) to 1/1/2021. 

According to the IRS, this law "allows taxpayers to exclude income from the discharge of debt on their principal residence. Debt reduced through mortgage restructuring, as well as mortgage debt forgiven in connection with a foreclosure, qualify for this relief."

Short sales, modifications with debt forgiveness, and deeds in lieu of foreclosure are now viable options for many more distressed homeowners for the remainder of 2020.

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

New Law: Foreclosure Standing Never Waived - Renew Your Case Today

On December 23, 2019, S5160 was enacted and "the defense, in a mortgage foreclosure action, of the plaintiff's lack of standing is not waived because of the defendant's failure to raise such defense in his or her responsive pleading."

A standing defense is utilized to argue that the plaintiff is not the right party to sue in that it's not the owner of the mortgage or debt and has not been appointed the power by such owner to pursue the lawsuit. This is one of the most significant changes to the foreclosure litigation practice since the Great Recession and will impact litigation for years to come.

Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law section 1302-a is an early Christmas present to defendants in ongoing litigation as it took effect immediately and appears to apply up until sale even if a Judgment of Foreclosure has already been ordered. Specifically, the new section states that "[a] defendant may not raise an objection or defense of lack of standing following a foreclosure sale." As such, it appears the defense of standing can be raised at any time before the sale.

If you are defending a case that is post-Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale and pre-auction sale, you may want to consider bringing an Order to Show Cause with a Motion to Renew pursuant to Civil Practice Law & Rules Rule 2221-e immediately.