LIEB BLOG

How current events impact business & real estate

Showing posts with label #NewYorkState. Show all posts
Showing posts with label #NewYorkState. Show all posts

Thursday, March 18, 2021

Fair Housing Education Now Mandatory for Appraisers

On March 17, 2021, NYS adopted a new regulation to be effective January 1, 2022, that mandates fair housing education as a condition of license renewal for appraisers.

The following subjects and number of hours are required under this new regulation:

(A) 7 Hour Introduction to Fair Housing and Fair Lending Instruction

        (1) Fair housing, fair lending requirements, and the history of lending, 2 hours

        (2) Development of appraisal (standard 1 USPAP), 1.5 hours

        (3) Reporting of appraisal reports (standard 2 USPAP), 1.5 hours

        (4) Case Studies, 2 hours

(B) 4 Hour Update to Fair Housing and Fair Lending Instruction

        (1) Fair housing, fair lending requirements, and the history of lending, 1 hour

        (2) Development of appraisal (standard 1 USPAP), 1 hour

        (3) Reporting of appraisal reports (standard 2 USPAP), 1hour

        (4) Case Studies, 1 hour

While it may be important to have additional fair housing education, how much education on fair housing is considered enough?

Should a 7-hour course on the introduction and a 4-hour update necessary to renew a license or certification, or should it be more or less?

Do you agree with NYS or how would you do it differently if you were in charge?




Tuesday, March 02, 2021

RE Closings: “Filthy” Condition is Broom Clean?

When selling a home, the contract may require that the home be in broom clean condition at closing.

Broom clean condition is a term often used to describe the condition of a home at the transfer of title (i.e., at closing). But what does it really mean to leave a home in broom clean condition?

In Witter v. Nitschke, the buyers claimed that the property was delivered in “filthy” condition, testifying that they observed hair in the bathrooms, dust and crumbs in the kitchen drawers, and cob webs and a dead fly on a window sill. However, the Court ruled that the premise was broom clean.

As the Court explained, “‘[B]room clean’ does not impose the duty on the seller to have the property professionally cleaned… If the buyers desire to have the property professionally cleaned at delivery of possession to the buyers the buyers need to negotiate a ‘professionally clean’ condition, rather than a ‘broom clean’ condition.”

All broom clean requires is that a home is cleared of all personal items, free of garbage, refuse, trash, and other debris.

Have you ever bought a house that required professional cleaning before you moved in? Are you going to require sellers to deliver it professionally cleaned in the future? Maybe you should.